Example 1

This example shows a simple visual representation of the Direct Abstract Model actors and transactions. The source file can be found here.
*Note in the event that Source and Destination are associated with the same HISP, the HISP to HISP messages would not apply. A depiction of that scenario can be seen here.
NHINDirect-AbstractModel_Example_1_v0.5.jpg


Example 2


Business Process Examples in Business Process Model Notation (BPMN):

Notes:
  1. As noted in Example 1 above regarding the Abstract Model...In the event that Source and Destination are associated with the same HISP, the HISP to HISP messages would not apply. A depiction of that scenario can be seen here
  2. For consistency purposes, user tasks in the diagrams below were illustrated in the same sequences in each diagram below. This is NOT to suggest that the users MUST execute these tasks in these same sequences. The only assertion implied in the diagrams below is that these same sequences of user tasks are ones that users might perform, and therefore, should be able to be supported in the Abstract Model. If other sequences of user tasks are found to force changes in the behaviors illustrated in the other swimlanes of the diagrams, then additional notes or even additional diagrams should be created to inform the readers.
  3. For Diagram Developers, XMI files with the BPMN diagrams are itemized below that can be imported into your modeling application. XMI 2.1 file format versions supporting older versions of UML (2.0 and 2.1) are available from the UModel modeling application as well:
    1. Export to XMI 2.1 for UML 2.2 Direct Abstract Model XMI 21 for UML 22.xmi
    2. Export to XMI 2.1 for UML 2.0 Direct Abstract Model XMI 21 for UML 20.xmi


Explanation of basic BPMN Diagrams:
BPMN diagrams allow organizations to be represented as 'pools with swimlanes.' The swimlanes within a pool represent sequential tasks (rounded rectangles) completed by human user actors and automated system actors that are participating in a business process within an organization. Multiple pools may be present to represent multiple organizations participating in a business process. The business process sequence flow is represented with a simple solid headed arrow, which may or may not be accompanied by a message arrow (dotted line with open head).

A Series of BPMN Examples (from two organizations communicating to each other to four organizations communicating sequentially):
In the Abstract Model, the kinds of messages that flow over the Internet will vary, depending on the configuration of the organizations involved in the path of the message. Below, a series of examples illustrating organizations with different Abstract Model configurations illustrate the differences in Internet message flow. The examples below start with messages flowing between only a "small" and a "large" organization. The examples finish with a fully distributed Abstract Model configuration of four separate organizations. Like the final example below, the diagram in Example 1 above also focuses on the Internet transactions in a fully distributed Abstract Model.

In these BPMN examples below, the only actual messages (dotted line and open arrow head) identified are those that cross the Internet from one organization to a second organization (each organization is represented as a separate pool). Accordingly in these diagrams, the combination of swimlanes in each pool illustrate only internal communications between actors within the organization, and any messages that might occur between these internal actors as the business process unfolds are purposely not illustrated. Typically, an engineer may abstract the sequence of Internet messages in this diagram into a UML sequence diagram when detailing the specifications for these transactions.

Simplest Business Process Examples (two organizations only):
1) Small Business to Large Business: In this BPMN diagram below, Human User A (a consumer or small business user) sends an Direct Message to Human User B in Organization B (an HIO also acting as an HISP).
Abstract_Model_--_Source_to_HISP+Desintation.jpg

2. Large Business to Small Business: In this BPMN diagram below, Human User B in Organization B (an HIO also acting as an HISP) sends a Direct Message to Human User A (a consumer or small business user). To keep identities of Human Users and Organizations from shifting, note that Human Users A & B have been maintained as the same human users as in the Diagram above. Organizations A & B are also the same organization as in the diagram above.

Abstract_Model_--_Source+HISP_to_Desintation.jpg

A Medium Complexity Example (three distributed organizations):
Small Business to HISP to Small Business: In this BPMN diagram below, Human User A (a consumer or small business user) sends a Direct Message to Human User D in Organization D (a small business user). However, in this configuration below, the communication path includes one organizations operating an HISP, Organization B.

Abstract_Model_--_Source_to_HISP_to_Destination.jpg

The Most Complex Business Process Example (four distributed organizations):
Small Business to HISP to HISP to Small Business: In this BPMN diagram below, Human User A (a consumer or small business user) sends a Direct Message to Human User D in Organization D (a small business user). However, in this configuration below, the communication path includes two organizations operating HISPs, Organization B and Organization C.

Abstract_Model_--_Source_to_HSP_to_HSP_to_Destination.jpg